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Computational and Mathematical Modeling Program (CAMMP)

What is CAMMP?

CAMMP stands for Computational and Mathematical Modeling Program and is a project of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Within the framework of various event formats, students and teachers actively engage in problem solving with the help of mathematical modeling and computer use. These are real problems from everyday life, industry or research.

CAMMP is a project that was developed at RWTH Aachen University (education laboratory CAMMP) and tested for several years. Now it has also been introduced at KIT.

 

Idea
CAMMP (Computational and Mathematical Modeling Program) brings together students and scientists to learn the basics of mathematical modeling using practical examples. The students work on solving challenging real-world problems using mathematical methods and computer simulations. Furthermore they are supported by scientists.

Numerical and mathematical modeling is the application of mathematical tools to solve complex real problems. The applications cover questions from the fields of finance, aerospace, video game design, medical imaging and ecology.

It is an ideal opportunity for those students who are interested in mathematics and computer science and would like to work on problem solving beyond theory. CAMMP gives students an insight into the professional world of mathematicians, computer scientists and engineers.

Source: CAMMP

Within the framework of CAMMP, there are various offers that teachers can take advantage of together with students:

    CAMMP day: Computer-aided Mathematical Modeling day at KIT, Karlsruhe
    CAMMP week: Computer-aided mathematical modeling week in a youth hostel

 

Program goals

CAMMP teaches the handling of mathematical modeling and thus also promotes skills in this field. In addition to and building on the curriculum in schools, working with mathematical modeling comprises the following steps:

  • Translating the colloquially formulated problem into a mathematical problem
  • Solution of the model using existing mathematical knowledge
  • Evaluation and verification of the solution received
  • Interpretation of results and description for the user

Source: CAMMP

By working in groups, the students additionally expand their team skills and learn to use hardware and software tools to solve problems.

Mathematics teachers can also benefit from intensive study of mathematical modelling, because real problems are perceived as very motivating by pupils. In this programme, teachers learn how to integrate complex and application-oriented problems into school lessons in order to encourage pupils to work independently.

By working in groups, the students additionally expand their team skills and learn to use hardware and software tools to solve problems.

Mathematics teachers can also benefit from intensive study of mathematical modelling, because real problems are perceived as very motivating by pupils. In this programme, teachers learn how to integrate complex and application-oriented problems into school lessons in order to encourage pupils to work independently.

 

History
Since 1993, the Technomathematics group of the Technical University of Kaiserslautern has been organizing a Mathematical Modeling week in Rhineland-Palatinate in June or July.

The project week was initiated by Professor Dr. Helmut Neunzert, the former director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM. Events based on this concept have since taken place regularly throughout Germany, Austria and Italy (South Tyrol).

In May 2011 Prof. Dr. Ahmed Ismail1, Dr. Nicole Faber2 and Prof. Dr. Martin Frank3 held the first CAMMP week in Nideggen. In the following year the CAMMP week 2012 in Voeren/Belgium was held with significantly more participants. Since 2012 CAMMP offers one-day CAMMP day projects where classes or courses can learn more about mathematical modelling in one day at RWTH Aachen University. In May 2013 CAMMP officially became a student laboratory and thus belongs to one of the EDULABS of RWTH Aachen University.

In September 2015, co-founder Prof. Dr. Ahmed E. Ismail left the student laboratory because he was offered a professorship in Virginia. In September 2017, Prof. Dr. Martin Frank accepted a call to KIT and, together with Maren Hattebuhr and Kirsten Wohak, established another CAMMP location in Karlsruhe.

1 to August 2015: Chair of Molecular Simulation and Transformation, RWTH Aachen; since September 2015: Research Group Molecular Simulation, West Virginia University.
2 Graduate School AICES, RWTH Aachen University.
3 until August 2017: MathCCES, RWTH Aachen; since September 2017: SCC, KIT.